"Do I need a web writer?"

What ever happened to white space used well??

What ever happened to white space used well??

We get this question a lot: “Do I need a web writer?”

My answer is always, “Yes.”

  1. It takes a good web writer to write economically (i.e., not too much but not too little).
  2. A good web writer knows how to jumpstart your web site’s search engine optimization (by using words and phrases that your potential customers and qualified leads use to search for services like yours).
  3. It takes a good web writer to treat your business objectively, giving it the content that will bring your target audience(s) to your website.

Traditionally, graphic design has been orderly: a copywriter writes the copy and a graphic designer makes it visually sing.

Somehow, this orderly universe was disrupted in 1996 or so by the incredible speed with which the Internet crashed over all of us.

The geeks — the ones who knew how to program a web page — found themselves in control of this new world. Because they didn’t know anything about graphic design, their pages looked pretty bad — and they simply required their customers to provide copy, which usually wasn’t any better.

Most small- and medium-sized businesses didn’t know enough to hire their own writers, or a producer to oversee the process and a designer to ensure that what was programmed was actually any good.

And, in some pockets of this world, this is still how business is done.

We want you to be happy with your final web site, and for nothing to be left out or forgotten in the process. And even though you may not know design principles, you know what you like. Basecamp Productions gives that to you.

In short, we let designers design and writers write. Your budget won’t know the difference, but you will. We also provide a producer to oversee the process — all at no additional cost to you. Call us today. 410.404.5559.

Video 101: Think you can’t afford a video? Think again

Camera crew of Radio Bremen in Munich, Germany...

Image via Wikipedia

Think you can’t afford a video? Think again

OK, I won’t taunt you with lines like, “But you can’t afford NOT to make a video.”

When you don’t have enough money, you don’t have enough money.

However, you may just have enough money. Although it often costs $15,000-$25,000 for a typical corporate video, you can get a perfectly good 5:00 (five-minute) video (nothing very fancy, few if any actors and other bells and whistles but still perfectly respectable) for $8K-$9K — if you know how to shop.

So I’ll help you plan a video that won’t break the bank. Here are five steps to a video production you may be able to afford.

  1. First, you’ll get a script, probably $2,000 if your topic doesn’t require additional research.
  2. Then, you’ll hire a producer and ask for three days — one preproduction, one production, and one post-production day. $1,500-$1,800. This producer will guide your video through each step.
  3. You’ll only use one shooting day with no more than two primary locations not far from each other. On that day, your camera crew (a videographer, an audio technician, and a producer) will get footage and interviews. That will cost you around $2,100, including meals and snacks during the day. (Be prepared to have your producer work with you to streamline the script so that you only need that one shooting day.)
  4. You’ll have the project edited, which will include any additional graphics, music, photographs, and so forth. Let’s say two days at $1,200 a day. $2,400.
  5. Narration will cost around $350.

If all goes as planned (and, really, I have to say that every video is different!), you will have great video for $8,650. That’s a bargain.

There are ways, obviously, to spend more money on a production, and there are a few ways to spend less. Plus, there are ways to stretch your footage, so that you’re creating several videos instead of just one.

Remember: you can afford a video if it pays for itself and then some.

If you think you have enough money for a video, get in touch. We’d be happy to chat about your ideas and how we can stick to the budget you have. Call Susan Branch Smith @410.404.5559.

Related articles

Viva public domain!

Viva public domain!

This lovely image comes from the Farm Security Administration and is of a Polish Farming couple. Photo by Jack Delano and assumed to be in the public domain.

Updated July 31st, 2018

“Viva public domain.” The words tantalize us with their promise of free images for our videos, web sites, and publications. Public domain images and audio can come from the government, the public, and commercial works whose copyright has expired.

But there’s a price to pay for all that free public domain candy. You need to know some basic rules, or you could wind up in court or owing someone money.

For instance, public domain does not mean “released.” “Released” indicates that the human subjects in the photo have been properly released, usually by signing a subject release form and being paid a sum of money. (more…)

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