Video 101: Think you can’t afford a video? Think again

Camera crew of Radio Bremen in Munich, Germany...

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Think you can’t afford a video? Think again

OK, I won’t taunt you with lines like, “But you can’t afford NOT to make a video.”

When you don’t have enough money, you don’t have enough money.

However, you may just have enough money. Although it often costs $15,000-$25,000 for a typical corporate video, you can get a perfectly good 5:00 (five-minute) video (nothing very fancy, few if any actors and other bells and whistles but still perfectly respectable) for $8K-$9K — if you know how to shop.

So I’ll help you plan a video that won’t break the bank. Here are five steps to a video production you may be able to afford.

  1. First, you’ll get a script, probably $2,000 if your topic doesn’t require additional research.
  2. Then, you’ll hire a producer and ask for three days — one preproduction, one production, and one post-production day. $1,500-$1,800. This producer will guide your video through each step.
  3. You’ll only use one shooting day with no more than two primary locations not far from each other. On that day, your camera crew (a videographer, an audio technician, and a producer) will get footage and interviews. That will cost you around $2,100, including meals and snacks during the day. (Be prepared to have your producer work with you to streamline the script so that you only need that one shooting day.)
  4. You’ll have the project edited, which will include any additional graphics, music, photographs, and so forth. Let’s say two days at $1,200 a day. $2,400.
  5. Narration will cost around $350.

If all goes as planned (and, really, I have to say that every video is different!), you will have great video for $8,650. That’s a bargain.

There are ways, obviously, to spend more money on a production, and there are a few ways to spend less. Plus, there are ways to stretch your footage, so that you’re creating several videos instead of just one.

Remember: you can afford a video if it pays for itself and then some.

If you think you have enough money for a video, get in touch. We’d be happy to chat about your ideas and how we can stick to the budget you have. Call Susan Branch Smith @410.404.5559.

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Track your own SEO and social media success

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So you want to prove to your boss that social media and other efforts are working.

Here are some great products that can help you.

SEMRUSH is a fantastic product, tracking local and national search engine results, as well as social media and other factors that can figure into your web site’s ranking. Subscription.

Advanced Web Ranking lets you track every key word in any search engine or directory on the Internet. Subscription.

Hub Spot lets you determine qualified leads and how to convert them. Hub Spot specializes in inbound marketing (bringing qualified leads to your site and converting them into customers). Try out HS’s free Web Site Grader to see how well your web site performs. There are also “graders” to grade your book marketing, Facebook and Twitter presence, blog, and press releases. Some free tools and a subscription plan.

I also like Spider Viewer, from WeBuildPages. Spider Viewer shows you your page as a search engine “spider” would view it — text and links. So if you want to analyze your meta information (and make sure you don’t have unwanted formatting, for instance), this is a good tool to use. It will also display all links — I’ve found this useful when considering whether my links are well worded. Free.

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